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, focused on how two married couples would sit when traveling together in a car.

Working-class couples would put the men in front and the women in back to emphasize male domination, Packard wrote, while middle-class couples would sit husbands and wives together in order to emphasize the centrality of the marriage bond.

After Bold Boundaries, however, I'm wondering if he didn't get it wrong.

What if the reason to seat a man from one couple and a woman from another was less about flirtation and more about the simple truth that even the most passionate monogamous relationship can't meet every single one of our emotional needs?

As Noah Berlatsky pointed out recently, the "tradition of marriage encompasses a good deal more variation" than many of its most conservative defenders like to admit.

The idea that lust makes platonic friendship impossible between straight men and women was, participants insisted, as antiquated as the cars in which Packard's subjects arranged themselves more than half a century ago."When we interact with someone through Twitter, we don't have to be distracted by their fantastic arms or gorgeous legs—we are more focused on what they are saying.As a result, people are more able to connect with someone simply as a person rather than as a (sexually attractive) man or woman." When it comes to navigating cross-sex friendships in marriage, secular folk could learn a thing or two from their evangelical Christian peers.After an announcement by one of his ex-girlfriends as such at her wedding, Charlie gets a reputation as being a good luck charm.Every woman he has slept with has met and married her dream man immediately following.

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